RHONA GORVY

Rhona Gorvy (nee Penn) was born in Springs, South Africa, of Lithuanian ancestry. Gorvy was deeply rooted to her Lithuanian heritage. Her father's family were from Svencyonys and Kaunas, and her mother's family were from Plunge. They were forced to flee anti-Semitism, and arrived in South Africa, where Gorvy was born in 1921. Around the time of her birth, Gorvy's father, grandfather and uncle passed away, and she was brought up by her widowed Lithuanian mother and grandmother.

Gorvy was given a box of crayons as a child, which for her was a priceless treasure, as she recognised the potential 'magic' these small coloured sticks had. From early on she was creative; drawing, painting, and writing plays. She also started writing poetry as a child, and at age twelve she read her own poetry on Aunt Margaret’s Children’s Hour radio program.

Gorvy had no formal training in art, and was largely self-taught as an artist. While she went to university and became a lecturer in Logopaedics (Speech and Hearing Therapy), Gorvy continued expressing her creative spirit through art and poetry. “I think there was something in me already at birth”, she said, “It's like a magnet. It pulls you, whether you like it or not.”

From a young age, Gorvy had a profound response to people and her environment, which she expressed in various art forms. She recalled her early years: “I experienced through my mother, a lot of pain that she and her family had known … as with my father ... whom I never knew ... though I longed to ... because of his untimely death.” It is as though the suffering and sorrow of those who had lived before her, Gorvy knew in her bones. In some ways she became a mouth-piece for their pain, in word and image, at both personal and collective levels. One of the images that exemplifies this, is ‘Target’/ ‘Derogation’ from her series ‘The Dream and the Abuse’, accompanied by these words from her poetry:

“You taunt me and scorn, for I was born different.
You make me the stranger, give me fist and not hand.
But all blood bleeds red, and all tears are salty,
And all men are buried in the earth’s blind sand.”

Gorvy wrote: “While I recoil from violence and brutality, I have been aware of the wastelands and sufferings of war, the abysmal horrors of genocide, and the indescribable evil of the Holocaust, and have been part of the sorrow and degradation of apartheid. We cannot wear rose-coloured glasses when we look at this darkness perpetuated by man… Art is often a mirror of man's soul, a record of his individual and social history. Looking into ourselves, the shadows and the light, we make our choices. With courage and compassion, we can transcend the terror, the fear, the hate and the prejudice within us…
“I also celebrate the glory, heroism, and creativity of mind and heart, which transcends earthly boundaries. Spiritual values can bring truth to humanity, so that Homo sapiens can be the Wise Man, the Knowing Man. That is our heritage and purpose.”

Gorvy had a deep understanding for both the complexity and the simplicity of life, and for the paradoxes that are at the core of our humanity. She was deeply empathic to nature, the environment, people and relationships – seeking to tune in to the soul of man. She embraced and celebrated the fullness of life, while knowing the dark side of man and nature, as well as the vulnerability of the human condition. To quote Gorvy from her poem ‘Lament of the Nation’ (from ‘The Dream and Abuse’ series):
“We all know the guilt of the sleepless,
long for bridges ‘tween frightened men,
to succour each one the other, and lift the fallen again.
We grieve, for together tethered our destinies entwine,
for the fruit that is aborted, tears the root of the vine.”

Art lecturer Stacey Vorster, in ‘The Art of Rhona Gorvy – Empathy made Tangible’ writes: “Where words fail in capturing the complexity and depth of humanity, Gorvy’s artwork makes tangible what makes us all fundamentally human … In Gorvy’s treatment of each subject, whether imagined or real, human or animal, her depth of insight demonstrates a profound level of empathy. The images and words she has left behind reach towards the far extremities of the human condition.”
Gorvy explored a variety of themes such as: freedom, family, the journey through life, human relationships, the passage of time, music, abandoned women, abuse, the impact of drugs and addiction, and others. Her perceptive work taps into conscious and unconscious processes, which she expressed at individual and archetypal levels.

Gorvy worked in a wide range of media, including drawings, intaglio, etching, aquatint and drypoint, monotypes, hand-painted collographs, painting, and sculpture, maintaining the integrity of each medium she worked in. She wrote poetry extensively, through which she expressed her philosophy and deep appreciation of life. In relation to her drawing, Gorvy had an innate ability to capture that which lies beneath the surface in little more than a simple line. “I am attracted to the beauty and simplicity of line, whereby much can be said with economy and implication.”

In addition to Gorvy’s unique single works, she also created a variety of series.
“I frequently work in series. This way I can explore and enrich a concept more fully than working with a single visualisation.” Art historian, Esmé Berman, in her article, ‘The Singular Art of Rhona Gorvy’, writes “When those variations are assembled as a series, the emotional intensity invested in the individual works is multiplied, and the impact upon the viewer is compounded.”

For some of these series, Gorvy created poems to accompany the artworks. They enhance the depth of expression that is evident in her art. Berman draws parallels in Gorvy’s art and poetry to the work of William Blake, writing that “she is as articulate verbally as she is visually, and she has added a new dimension to several of her graphic themes, by composing a poem to accompany each image in the series. Text and images are complementary, each reinforcing the impact of the other”. She adds that while some of Gorvy’s art can be heart-wrenching, other work reflects a lighter side with joy and humour. Berman also comments on Gorvy’s “uniqueness and courage to ignore prevailing conventions”.

Gorvy’s own words offer an additional understanding of her approach: “My work has its greatest source in intuition. My themes mostly revolve around the psyche of people as individuals, and in relation to each other and their environment. I strive to create a truthful rendering, where form, medium and content lead to an aesthetic integration and inner response… I often work symbolically. Some themes are serious, some humorous, and some allegorical. My view is that art, though an act of essential and creative release, is also an act of love and concern that, hopefully, involves the observer … As an artist, it is important to give of myself, and make a contribution to enhance life, and be of service to my fellow man. If just one of my artworks can touch someone else's soul, there will be no greater privilege.’’

For over eighty years, Gorvy created an extraordinary body of artwork. Her versatility and courage in artistic experimentation gave expression to her empathy and understanding of what it means to be human. Gorvy's art, while being highly individual, holds universal appeal, leaving a lasting impression on those who view it. “I believe that the creative arts enhance humanity, enabling communion of the spirit, blessing both the giver and the receiver.”
Gorvy continued to create sensitive and compelling work into her nineties. She passed away in July 2016, three weeks before her ninety-fifth birthday.

Prayer
(Poem from Rhona Gorvy’s series ‘The Dream and the Abuse’)

The half-veiled miracles resurgent life
The rhythmic seasons measured plan –
My words sound thin to wonder at these things
And reverence the soul of man.
So small I am as pollen on the flower,
As mote of dust on dancing air,
As fleeting as seconds in the hour –
And so I bow my head in prayer.

RHONA GORVY

BIOGRAPHY

SUMMARY

Rhona Gorvy (nee Penn) was born in Springs, South Africa, in 1921, of Lithuanian ancestry. She grew up in Johannesburg and completed her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Logopaedics (Speech and Hearing Therapy) at the University of the Witwatersrand in 1944, and became a clinical member of the American Speech Therapists Association in 1945. She worked as a supervisor at the Speech and Hearing Clinic, and lectured in Speech Pathology, at the University of the Witwatersrand. In relation to her art, Gorvy expressed herself through different art forms from an early age, and when she was at university, her passion for art deepened. She won awards for sculpture, drawing, play-writing and poetry, and later she was invited by Dr Rita Brock of Harvard, to apply for the Bunting Scholarship. She was largely self-taught, though she did attend classes with Guisseppe Cattaneo, Joyce Leonard, Elizabeth Harrington and at the George Boys School of Visual Arts.

For over eighty years, Gorvy produced an oeuvre of sketches, prints, paintings, sculptures and poetry that document her empathic experience of the inner and outer worlds. She was deeply perceptive and worked both intuitively and symbolically. Gorvy had a strong connection with her subjects, and explored a wide range of themes relating to life and the human condition. These included relationships, freedom, motherhood, loss, abuse, addiction, music, and other conscious and unconscious processes. Gorvy’s body of work encompasses almost everything that touched her life, and grappled with the question of what it means to be human. She had an innate ability to capture that which lies beneath the surface in little more than a simple line. Gorvy abstracted the emotional realm, as well as the psyche and body, and expressed herself at individual and archetypal levels, both in visual media, as well as in poetry.

As a versatile artist, in addition to her sculpture, painting and poetry, Gorvy often focused on graphics and printmaking, media that expressed her fine line and drawing talents. Her printmaking included intaglio, etching, aquatint, drypoint, hand-painted collographs, and monoprint. Gorvy produced unique single works as well as a number of series.
Gorvy continued to create sensitive and compelling work into her nineties. She passed away in July 2016, three weeks before her ninety-fifth birthday

SOLO EXHIBITIONS:

2017 ‘Creative Insights’, Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum, Vilnius, Lithuania
2014 Art Eye Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
2011 Gordon Institute of Business Science, Johannesburg, South Africa
2006 Art on Paper, Johannesburg, South Africa
2004 Centre Culturel Christiane Peugeot, Paris, France
1994 International Gallery of Contemporary Printmaking, Philadelphia,
United States of America
1989 Rhona Gorvy Drawings: Singapore, Nepal and India, U.J.W., South Africa
1988 Galerie Salammbo, Paris, France
1986 South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa
1983 Bullocks, Los Angeles, United States of America
1981 Art Dimensions, Los Angeles, United States of America
1979 Gallery International, Cape Town, South Africa
1975 Natal Association of Arts, Durban, South Africa
1975 South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa
1973 Gallery International, Cape Town, South Africa
1971 Gallery International, Cape Town, South Africa
1971 South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa
1970 Helen de Leeuw Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1970 Natal Association of Arts, Durban, South Africa
1970 South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa

GROUP EXHIBITIONS:

2017 The Cape Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa
2016 Affordable Art Fair New York, New York, United States of America
2016 Saxon Hotel, Johannesburg, South Africa
2016 The Cape Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa
2016 The Yellow Barn Gallery, Glen Echo, Maryland,
United States of America
2015 The Cape Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa
2015 Art Eye Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
2014 ‘Mini Masterpieces’, The Studio, Kalk Bay, South Africa
2014 Art Eye Gallery, Hermanus, South Africa
2014 Young Blood Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa
2013 Young Blood Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa
2012 ‘Matriarchs in Conversation: Rhona Gorvy and Esther Mahlangu’,
Sibisi Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
2011 Rabbi Cyril Harris Community Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa
2010 ‘100 Doors of Hope’, Johannesburg Child Welfare, Johannesburg,
South Africa
2008 ‘In Celebration of Israel at 60’, the South African Zionist Federation, Johannesburg, South Africa

2007 ‘Journeys Encounters’, the XVIIth Congress of the IAAP, Cape Town,
South Africa
2004 Centre Cultural Christiane Peugeot, Paris, France
2004 ‘In Praise of Small Format’, Paris, France
2003 ‘Women Artists: Rape Doll Exhibition’, Museum Africa, Johannesburg,
South Africa
2003 ‘Women Artists: Rape Doll Exhibition’, University of Pretoria, Pretoria,
South Africa
2001 ‘Jewish Artists’, Union of Jewish Women, Johannesburg, South Africa
1999 Parliament of World Religions, Cape Town, South Africa
1998 South African Jewish Women Artists, JCC, Houston, Texas,
United States of America
1995 Spring Art Festival, Johannesburg, South Africa
1994 International Gallery of Contemporary Printmaking, Philadelphia,
United States of America
1993 Shaman Show, Aine Art Museum, Tornia, Finland
1993 Momentum Art, Pretoria, South Africa
1992 Botticelli Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1992 Fine Arts Competition, Beeldende Kunste Kompetisie, South Africa, (Award)
1992 ‘South African Artists’, Kempton Park Fine Arts, South Africa
1990-1993 South African Embassy, Washington, United States of America
1990-1991 Cassirer Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1989 The South African Medical Arts Society, Johannesburg, South Africa
1988 Salammbo, Geneva, Switzerland
1988 Cape Town Triennial, South Africa
1986–1996 International Juried Exhibition of Miniature Art, Del Bello Gallery, Toronto, Canada (Chosen to represent South Africa; selected to exhibit for 10 years)
1986 ‘Peace’, Gallery Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
1986 South African Association of Arts Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1986 The South African Medical Arts Society, Johannesburg, South Africa
1985 The South African Medical Arts Society, Johannesburg, South Africa
1984 ‘Healing and Art’, Total Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1984 ‘Miniatures’, Gallery 21, Johannesburg, South Africa
1984 The South African Medical Arts Society, Johannesburg, South Africa
1983 ‘Le Poisson – The Fish’, Gallery 21, Johannesburg, South Africa
1983 ‘The Nude in 21’, Gallery 21, Johannesburg, South Africa
1982 South African Nature Conservation Centre, South Africa
1982 The South African Medical Arts Society, Total Gallery, Johannesburg,
South Africa
1980 The South African Jewish Board of Deputies, Johannesburg, South Africa
1979 Gallery International, Cape Town, South Africa
1978 ‘Seven Artists’, Gallery International, Cape Town, South Africa
1977 Artsculapian Society Exhibition, Johannesburg, South Africa
1977 Ateljee Thijs Nel, Johannesburg, South Africa
1977 Lichtenburg Municipal Gallery, Lichtenburg, South Africa 1976 Bank Gallery, Pretoria, South Africa
1976 ‘Group 10’, South African Association of Arts, Northern Transvaal, South Africa
1976 ‘Paintings by Group 10’, South African Association of Arts,
Johannesburg, South Africa
1976 ‘Playback ’76’, Lidchi Art Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1976 ‘Women Artists’, South African Association of Arts, Pretoria, South Africa
1975 South African Association of Arts, Natal, South Africa
1973 Art South Africa Today Exhibition, Durban, South Africa
1973 Lincoln Square Synagogue, New York, United States of America
1973 Nicro Fair, Rembrandt Pavilion, Johannesburg, South Africa
1973 South African Biennale, Durban, South Africa
1973 The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, London, England
1972 Frans du Toit Gallery, Potchefstroom University, Potchefstroom,
South Africa
1972 Potchefstroom University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
1972 Lincoln Square Synagogue, New York, United States of America
1972 South African Biennale, Durban, South Africa
1971 Arts Association Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1971 ‘Mother and Child’, Gallery 101, Johannesburg, South Africa
1971 Hebert Evans Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1970 South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa
1970 South African Association of Arts, Natal, South Africa
1970 South African Association of Arts, Southern Transvaal, South Africa
1969-1970 New Signatures Exhibition, Pretoria, South Africa (award for drawing)
1968 South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, South Africa
1968 George Boys Studio, Johannesburg, South Africa
1968 ‘Two Women Show’, Visual Arts Studio, Johannesburg, South Africa
1967 Lidchi Art Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1966 Lidchi Art Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa
1966 Republic Arts Festival, Pretoria, South Africa (award for sculpture)

COLLECTIONS:

Constitutional Court Art Collection, Johannesburg, South Africa
Greatermans Collection, Cape Town, South Africa
Honorary Consulate of Lithuania, Johannesburg, South Africa
Jewish Board of Deputies, Johannesburg, South Africa
Lichtenburg Municipal Gallery, South Africa
Lithuanian Embassy, Tel Aviv, Israel
Lithuanian Embassy, Pretoria, South Africa
South African Embassy, Washington, DC, United States of America
Spier Art Collection, Cape Town, South Africa
University of Potchefstroom, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Vilna Gaon State Jewish Museum, Vilnius, Lithuania
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia, United States of America
Zoo Lake, Johannesburg, South Africa

PRIVATE COLLECTIONS:

Australia, Canada, England, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Lithuania,
New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, United States of America

SERIES TITLES:

In Search of Freedom
Man with a Rope
Time
Battered Baby (on victimisation and abuse)
The Dream and the Abuse (on drug addiction)
The Garland and the Chain (on relationships)
Our Society
Abandoned Woman
Death of a Soldier
Story of a Life
See-Saw
Bullfight
Elegy
Adam and Eve
The Death Moth (paintings)
Family I (sculptures)
Family II (sculptures)
Chess set (sculptures)

PUBLICATIONS:

‘A Good Look at Woman’, Sunday Tribune, South Africa, 31 August, 1975
Art Dimensions Gallery, Los Angeles, United States of America, 1981
‘Art of Rhona Gorvy’, The Daily News, Durban, South Africa, 16 November, 1970
‘Art that Sings their own Sweet Song’, South African Jewish Report, South Africa,
8 December, 2006
‘Artist Expresses a Woman’s Point of View’, Cape Times, South Africa,
15 September, 1971
‘Artist Looks at Drug Scene’, The Star, South Africa, 15 October, 1970
Artlook 5:39, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1972
Artsculapian Society Exhibition, Johannesburg, South Africa, August, 1977
Berig, E., ‘Permanente Uitstalling Van Kuns By P.U.’, Die Volksblad, South Africa,
23 February, 1972
Berman, Esmé, ‘Berman’s Art & Artists of South Africa’, Johannesburg,
South Africa, 1973, 1993, 2009 (Classic Edition)
Berman, Esmé, ‘The Singular Art of Rhona Gorvy’, unpublished, South Africa, January, 2014
‘Bonolo Botshelo. Fragile Life’, Museum Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa, March, 2004
Boys, George, ‘Rhona Gorvy’, Artlook, 48, Johannesburg, South Africa, November, 1970

Bronze Sculpture (Rhona Gorvy), Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, The Star,
South Africa, 9 February, 1976
Cheales, Richard, ‘A touch of Boys’, The Star, South Africa, 24 February, 1976
Cheales, Richard, ‘Exhibition provides dash and aplomb’, The Star, South Africa,
13 April, 1971
Cheales, Richard, ‘Gorvy Graphics Tops’, The Star, South Africa, 16 October, 1970
Cheales, Richard, The Star, South Africa, 19 November, 1971
Cheales, Richard, The Star, South Africa, 15 April, 1970
Cheales, Richard, The Star, South Africa, 29 November, 1968
Children’s Theatre Productions, ‘Aladdin’, Aladdin, Artistic Coordinator - Rhona Gorvy,
South Africa, 1982
Children’s Theatre Productions, ‘Pinocchio’, Pinocchio, Artistic Coordinator - Rhona Gorvy,
South Africa, 1979
Children’s Theatre Productions, ‘Tales of Hans Christian Anderson’, Tales of Hans
Christian Anderson, Artistic Coordinator - Rhona Gorvy, South Africa, 1980
Children’s Theatre Productions, ‘The Wizard of Oz’, The Wizard of Oz’, Artistic
Coordinator - Rhona Gorvy, South Africa, 1981
Collector’s Guide to Art and Artists in South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa, 1998
‘Comment’, National Broadcast, Johannesburg, South Africa, September, 1975-1976
‘Come and Join in the Fun’ The Star, South Africa, July, 1979
Dictionary of International Biography, Cambridge, England, 1975
Dodd, Alex, ‘Art’, ‘Gorvy’s In Search of Freedom’, Business Day, South Africa,
27 February, 2006
Francois, M., ‘Graphics Dominate Gorvy Show’, Daily News, South Africa,
November, 1970
Gallery International, ‘Rhona Gorvy’, Cape Town, South Africa, 1971
Gallery International, ‘Rhona Gorvy’, Cape Town, South Africa, 1973
Gorvy, Rhona, ‘Dualities of a Woman Artist’, Jewish Affairs, (cover painting and
article by Rhona Gorvy), South Africa, October, 1975
Gorvy, Rhona, ‘Prayer’, Jewish Affairs, (cover painting and poetry by Rhona Gorvy),
South Africa, September, 1981
‘Graphic Works’, The Star, South Africa, October, 1986
Green, Eldred, ‘Empathy, ability to draw’, Cape Times, South Africa, September, 1971
‘In Celebration of Israel at 60’, The South African Zionist Federation Art Exhibition, Johannesburg, South Africa, September, 2008
International Exhibition of Miniature Art, Del Bello Gallery, Toronto, Canada,
1986-1996 (Chosen to represent South Africa; selected to exhibit for 10 years)
International Who’s Who in Art and Antiques, Cambridge, England, 1972
International Who’s Who of Women, Cambridge, England, 1972, 1975
J. G., ‘Women and Child Theme Well Expressed’, The Daily News, South Africa,
27 August, 1975
‘Journeys, Encounters; Clinical, Communal, Cultural’, The XVIIth Congress of
the IAAP, Cape Town, South Africa, 2007
Kempton Park Fine Arts, Kempton Park, South Africa, 1992
Knight, Natalie, ‘Artist of the Sub-Conscious’, unpublished, South Africa, 1971
Knight, Natalie, ‘Below the Conscious Mind’, The Star, South Africa, 21 September, 1971
Knight, Natalie, ‘Rhona Gorvy’, The Star, South Africa, September, 1970
‘Kunsdeurbraak Vir Potchefstroom: ‘n Eie Kunsgalery!’, Die Noordwester,
South Africa, 25 February, 1972
Lamentation by Rhona Gorvy, Lamentation, Medal for Poetry, South Africa, 1968
Levin, Doreen, ‘Rhona’s etchings of baby battering stir Americans’, Sunday Times,
South Africa, 31 July, 1983
Lichtenburg Art Society, Lichtenburg, South Africa, 1977
Lidchi Art Gallery, Paintings Drawings and Sculpture, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1966
Lincoln Square Synagogue, New York, United States of America, 7 May, 1972
Lincoln Square Synagogue, New York, United States of America, 16 May, 1973
M. F., ‘Graphics dominate Gorvy show’, Daily News, South Africa, 18 November, 1970
‘Making the Scene – Draughtsmanship’, Artlook, Johannesburg, South Africa, April, 1968
‘Meet Rhona Gorvy’, Litvakworld, Lithuania, 2016, 2017
Momentum Art/Kuns, South Africa, 1993
‘Mother and Child’, The Star, South Africa, 9 February, 1976
Myburg, Johan, ‘Oorsiguitstalling vir Gorvy op 92’, Beeld, South Africa, 23 June, 2014
O Connor, Marie, ‘Art’, Natal Society of Arts, South Africa, November, 1970
Ogilvie, Grania, Dictionary of South African Painters and Sculptors, Everard Read,
Johannesburg, South Africa, 1988-9
‘Oh what a piece of work is man’, Décor and Designer- Rhona Gorvy, School of Art Ballet and Music, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1975
Parliament of World Religions, Cape Town, South Africa, 1999
Pender, Fiona, ‘Rhona Intrigued’, David Krut Publishing, Johannesburg,
South Africa, 21 September, 2007
‘Permanente Uitstalling van Kuns by P.U.’, Die Volksblad, South Africa, 23 February, 1972
‘Pinocchio’, The Star, Johannesburg, South Africa, 11 July, 1979
‘Potchefstroom University Has Own Art Gallery’, Western Transvaal Record,
South Africa, 25 February, 1972
Rand Daily Mail, South Africa, 22 October, 1970
‘Republic Festival Art Exhibitions’, S.A. Association of Arts, May, 1966
Rhona Gorvy, Boyhood of Grieg, Children’s play, Johannesburg, 1968
Rhona Gorvy, Creative Insights, Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum, Vilnius, Lithuania, 2017
‘Rhona Gorvy Drawings: Singapore, Nepal and India’, U.J.W., Public Presentation,
South Africa, 1989
‘Rhona Gorvy’ N.S.A. Gallery, Natal Art Society Catalogue, 1975, South Africa
‘Rhona Gorvy’, Newsdart, Natal, South Africa, July-October, 1975
‘Rhona Gorvy: Something to Say’, Cape Times, South Africa, September, 1971
Roberts, Oliver, ‘An Ageless Eye’, Sunday Times Magazine, South Africa,
21 September, 2014
Royal Academy Summer Exhibition Catalogue, London, 1973
Sacks, Eddy, ‘Rhona Gorvy – Talent and Drive – Profile of a New Woman Artist’,
South African Jewish Times, South Africa, November, 1970
Sacks, Hadassah, ‘Art Exhibition at Board Museum’, Jewish Affairs, South Africa, June, 1980
Salammbo Video catalogue, Geneva, Switzerland, 1988
‘Seven Artists’, Gallery International, Cape Town, South Africa, July–August, 1978
‘South African Journal of Family Practice’, Cover- Rhona Gorvy, South Africa, 1986
‘So Word S.A. Kuns Vinnig Versamel’, Die Burger, South Africa, 15 February, 1972
Spring Art Festival. In Celebration of Jerusalem’s 3000th Anniversary, Johannesburg,
South Africa, 1995
‘Talent at all woman show’, Pretoria News, Pretoria, South Africa, September, 1976
‘Triumph for Rhona Gorvy’, Zionist Record and South African Chronicle,
South Africa, 19 September, 1975
The Collector’s Guide to Art and Artists in South Africa, South Africa, 1998
The Eleventh Annual Exhibition of the South African Medical Arts Society,
Johannesburg, South Africa, November, 1986
The Nude in 21, Gallery 21, Johannesburg, South Africa, June 1983
The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1973, London, England, 1973
The South African Art Market, Art Institute of South Africa, South Africa, 1972
The South African Art Times, Johannesburg, South Africa, August, 2013
The South African Art Information Directory (SAAID), Cape Town, South Africa,
2004, 2005, 2006
South African Association of Arts, Johannesburg, 1970
The South African Jewish Board of Deputies, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1980
The South African Medical Arts Society, Johannesburg, South Africa,
September, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1989
The World Who’s Who of Women, Cambridge, England, 1976
Three Exhibiting Artists, The Star, South Africa, 17 June, 1983
Union of Jewish Women, Johannesburg, South Africa, October, 2001
‘Van Spraakkuns tot Skilderkuns’, Die Burger, South Africa, September, 1971
‘Versatile – Rhona Gorvy’, Pretoria News, South Africa, 23 September, 1976
Verster, Andrew, ‘Rhona Gorvy’, Daily News, South Africa, November, 1975
Vorster, Stacey, ‘The Art of Rhona Gorvy- Empathy Made Tangible’, unpublished, South Africa, April, 2017
Vorster, Stacey, ‘The Art of Rhona Gorvy- Empathy Made Tangible’, Video, South Africa, April, 2017
Westgate TV Series, Johannesburg, South Africa, 1984-85
‘What Money Cannot Buy’, Union News, South Africa, April, 1980
Who’s Who in International Art, Lausanne, Switzerland, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995
Winder, H. E., ‘Art Notes’, Rand Daily Mail, South Africa, October, 1970
Winder, H. E., ‘Competent and Inspired Group’, Rand Daily Mail, South Africa, 23 February, 1976
Winder, H. E., ‘Mother and Child Exhibition’, Rand Daily Mail, South Africa, 9 April, 1971
Winder, H. E., ‘Rhona Gorvy’, Rand Daily Mail, South Africa, 18 March, 1971
Winder, H. E., ‘The Sculpture is the Strong’, Rand Daily Mail, South Africa, April, 1971
‘Women Artists Exhibit’, S A Arts Calendar, Vol 1, no.8, Johannesburg,
South Africa, September, 1976
Zebra Register of South African Artists and Galleries, Johannesburg,
South Africa, 2001, 2002, 2003
Zionist Record and S.A. Jewish Chronicle, South Africa, 21 October, 1970
Zionist Record and S.A. Jewish Chronicle, South Africa, 13 September, 1974